Question: When To Use Was And Were?

Why do we say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations.

This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you).

In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be..

How do you tell the difference between where and were?

Overall, they differ in the following aspects:’Were’ is a verb, whereas ‘where’ is an adverb of time.’Were’ is a plural past word, whereas ‘where’ is a question word.’Were’ is pronounced using the schwa sound, while ‘where’ uses the ‘long e’ stress with a gentle ‘h’ sound at the start.

What is the word were?

Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. … Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use. SUGGESTION: To test whether were is the correct word to use in a sentence, see if you can use are in its place, putting the sentence into the present tense.

What is another word for were?

Were Synonyms – WordHippo Thesaurus….What is another word for were?madewasmeanedenactedincarnatedcome up tostewardedcome to berun tobought for76 more rows

Can you end a sentence with were?

It’s not an error to end a sentence with a preposition, but it is a little less formal. In emails, text messages, and notes to friends, it’s perfectly fine. But if you’re writing a research paper or submitting a business proposal and you want to sound very formal, avoid ending sentences with prepositions.

Had been Vs have been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

Is if always followed by were?

In both sentences above, the “if” clause contains a form of the past tense of the verb. There is one exception to this rule, however. If the verb in the if clause is “to be,” use “were,” even if the subject of the clause is a third person singular subject (i.e., he, she, it).

Has been submitted or was submitted?

is correct. Present perfect tense is used, because the actions related to your application (review and decision) are in the present time frame. Past perfect would be correct if those actions were completed: I had submitted the application, but the position was already filled.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

What are the rules for were and were?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they. There is a tip you might want to consider. Even though you are singular, you must use “were”.

Is it ware or wear?

Ware is a noun that refers to manufactured goods. As a verb, wear means “to have on one’s person”; as a noun, it means “clothing.” Where refers to location; it can be an adverb, a conjunction, or a noun. Where do you plan to sell your wares?

What is the past tense of was?

Simple past tense of to be, to have, to doSubjectVerbIwashadYouwerehadHe/She/ItwashadWewerehad3 more rows

Where we use have been?

Usage of “Have Been & Has Been” When we are talking about the present: If the subject of a sentence is I – You – We – They or a plural noun (cars, birds, children) we use ‘have been’. If the subject of the sentence is He – She – It or a singular noun (car, bird, child) we use ‘has been’.

Is if she were correct grammar?

“If she was” is past tense, indicative mood. It describes something that happened or may have happened in the past. … “If she were” is present tense, subjunctive mood. It describes a hypothetical situation that is not true.

When to use was VS has been?

The difference between “has been” and “was” is that “has been” is used in the present perfect continuous tense whereas “was” is used in the past continuous tense. They are used for two different tenses and for two different times, present and past.

When to use was and were in a sentence?

As I said above, was and were are in the past tense, but they are used differently. Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they). I was driving to the park.

When should you use where and were?

Were is the past tense of be when used as a verb. Where means in a specific place when used as an adverb or conjunction. A good way to remember the difference is that where has an “h” for “home”, and home is a place. Out of the two words, “were” is the most common.